Informed by psychology, philosophy, anthropology, human-animal studies, personal interviews and field work, I explore the complexities of interspecies relationships through a range of media including sculpture, photography and concept mapping. I am especially interested in the process of honoring nonhuman animal life. Honoring can take many forms, ranging from traditional burials and funerary rites to everyday acts such as story-telling, picture-making and memory production. It may also be construed as a psychological state of reverence, expressed in simple acts of caring. I begin my work by carefully cleaning, bleaching, drying, sanding and polishing the bones of common animals such as chicken, turkey, cow, deer, lamb and snake. The bones may be soft and smooth, hard and shiny, delicate and lacy or rough and jagged. Shades of white, cream and ecru permeate my work. Themes of mourning, sadness, gratitude, reverence, humility, hypocrisy, paradox and inequality emerge through porous substrates. I seek to create spaces for contemplation, questioning and dialogue. Acts of honoring dissolve the boundaries between species and encourage thoughtful choices about the care and treatment of non-human animals. My art work explores the myriad ramifications and consequences of such choices.